402 posts in this topic

:o

 

and:

Wow!!!

QFT!

 

There are two contradictory issues with gaming buildings.  First, they need enough space inside to have models inside and/or on the roof.  This means a minimum of 1" wide terraces, balconies, and hallways.  The other problem is that you want the buildings smaller than actual size, so that they don't take over the entire table for a single building.  Or at least smaller than the western standard.  I'm pretty sure I saw a good number of buildings that were maybe 20 feet wide (just the building, no lawn or anything) when I was in Japan, not like the 85x115ft lot /65x40 house where I grew up.

 

Those buildings from Japan would be excellent candidates for MAS District 5 apartments, just with a different top and bottom floor.

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OMG!!!! That building is stunning! How on earth did you make and what from???

 

I love the glow of the lights, can't wait to see how the whole board turns out, if the quality and imagination is anything like the above building is going to be STUNNING!!!

:D

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What the...?

How did you do this? :o

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OMG!!!! That building is stunning! How on earth did you make and what from???

 

I love the glow of the lights, can't wait to see how the whole board turns out, if the quality and imagination is anything like the above building is going to be STUNNING!!!

:D

 

 

What the...?

How did you do this? :o

 

I tried so many ways to get the curves right.  The only thing that worked, absent spending a small fortune on something that molded plastics, and kept the weight down and the durability up, was paper.  Laminating paper, essentially poster board, but budgets being what they are -- and this one was tight, I ended up raiding my recycling bin for old cereal and cracker boxes for building materials.  You can see hints of that in the WIP shots.  Waste not, want not ;)  Also wood filler, the yellow stuff for interior use.

 

M4rjtUs.jpg

 

FOuJJgy.jpg

 

Oh, the greeting cards.  I could not find a good cardstock...I needed 75# cardstock, and all I could find was 110#.  So...all those cards charities send out...You donate to one or two charities and BOOM!  suddenly everybody sends you stuff like greeting cards. Good thing I started this right after the holidays.

 

SrQkrhe.jpg

 

The surface...oh thank Almighty Providence for airbrushes.  Had to run sand through a series of screens to remove large grains.  Then lay on a thick coat of housepaint and sprinkle the sand on it.  Then airbrush a few base coats over that.  Perfect texturing to simulate the sandstone veneer on the real thing (And it is veneer.  The seam lines are visible. A bit tacky in a $200 million dollar building.)  Textured paint or spackle or grout would not have given me the even texturing that I wanted.  This texture method is durable, albeit messy.  I have used this method on all manner of terrain, some going back 15-16 years, and it holds up to all manner of abuse.

 

1UeT9MM.jpg

 

I also had a helper. Or a prospective home buyer. :) 

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I'd like to quote every post ever made in this thread.

That may sum up how stunning this is.

 

And you covered up the paper pretty good. Never thought it was that "simple" after all.

Still a heck of a lot of work to do the "frame", I guess.

 

Question: Is this in proper 28mm-scale?

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That's an impressive piece of terrain! I get the feeling i'm gonna enjoy this thread. :)

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I'd like to quote every post ever made in this thread.

That may sum up how stunning this is.

 

And you covered up the paper pretty good. Never thought it was that "simple" after all.

Still a heck of a lot of work to do the "frame", I guess.

 

Question: Is this in proper 28mm-scale?

Actually, 1/200, or close enough. Detailed plans of Federal buildings are not easily obtained, and those seeking such plans tend to attract the attention of an alphabet soup of federal agencies.

@Sasquatch. Thanks. I am certainly enjoying your thread. You'll pardon me if I ocassionally borrow some ideas...those windows and doors possibly.

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Borrow away fella I'd see it as a compliment.

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Looks great, imagine playing with it at a bigger scale closer to infinity, maybe the next project? :)

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Or at least smaller than the western standard.  I'm pretty sure I saw a good number of buildings that were maybe 20 feet wide (just the building, no lawn or anything) when I was in Japan, not like the 85x115ft lot /65x40 house where I grew up.

For a limited definition of "western" as Europe is full of tiny houses too or streets were eurocars just pass "at the driver's own risk". In general the issue is that the cities can be traced back centuries, when all transport was muscle based; with some funny cases where you can blame taxes like Amsterdam. Even streets created 25-50 years ago are not as wide as "western standard" would say. It's rather funny seeing "this one is bigger than the previous" cars try to navigate streets or enter parkings in some cities.

On the other hand, would future colonies go for packed or spread? And what's the problem with fighting on the top of a building? With enough piping, air conditioning, elevators and other service equipment, it would be both real looking and playable. The top of that building would become a very nice leisure space, a full garden with all kind of plants and statues, both in game and real life terms.

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Progress on the building.  The walls are up on the first medium sized building.  I kind of made it up as I went along.  Part of it was salvaged from my first attempt at the NMAI.  I intend to make 3 or 4 buildings of this size.

uriKbL2.jpg

 

eH0h5RL.jpg

 

s6vPlis.jpg

 

 

You can never have enough clamps.  Word.
 
eU5Kiar.jpg
 
As you can see, the curves hold their shapes fairly well.   I enjoy working with curves.  Maybe it's a guy thing?
 
xqTQEmW.jpg
 
 
Made a silly n00b mistake, I must confess.  I let myself run out of PVA glue.  So progress ground to a halt on the building.   
 
OnwCJDY.jpg
 
ALLQbBq.jpg
 
Here are a few other bits from the workbench, but aren't intended for this board.  A Quonset hut*  that I need to finish at some point.  Tank/refinery pieces that would make a nice little terrain set if I ever finished them.
 
OUThVC9.jpg
 
ONWtNGX.jpg
 
The other thing on my mind is something along the lines of a 'sand-fence'  similar in purpose to a snow-fence.  For the board it would make nice full cover scatter terrain pieces.  I'll have to figure out a way to make them look cool.  I don't want Jersey Barriers.  I want this board to look like nothing anyone has ever seen before. 
 
* I could call it a Nissen hut, but  I won't. 
 
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Wondered how you did the curvey structure, looks great! 

 

I buy my industial PVA from hardware stores in 2 litre bottles, its a bad day when you run out of PVA!

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I do the same in fact. Though they are gallon measures here in the states.  I also keep a gallon of wood glue on hand along with several tubes of liquid nails.  Running out of raw materials is a real pain.  In fact, I'll be buying another bin of plaster of paris very shortly as I'm better then 50% through the current tub.

 

Another thing to keep in mind is that the gallon (Or 2 liter) measures are significantly cheaper than buying smaller measures bit by bit.  The large containers also keep.  I've had the same gallon of PVA for better then 5 years.  I use wood glue much more frequently.

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It was a half gallon container. I keep 2 8oz bottles that I fill from the 1/2gallon. Emptied one 8 ouncer, thought the other was still full...nope. No worries, the local DIY and a Hobby/Craft store are on the way home from work.

This sort of lamination uses a lot of glue. Wood glue, aliphatic resin, would be a less than optimal choice here. I like using wood glue for wood (forgive statement of obvious...been a long week) and foam. But with foam--eps or xps, if you're laminating, house paint, the 'Oops we mixed the wrong color' stuff the DIY sells for $5/gallon. Apply to foam, place pieces together, place weight on pieces, wait a week, or two...voilá. Made hills that way which are near indestructible. Big ones too, 24"x36" big.

Still need to try that Weld-on stuff for acrylic. I have a few ideas...

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The issue I have with the paint solution for laminating foam is the wait a week part. At least with wood glue an over night set time is usually a suficcient amount of time to allow working with it. It usually isn't dry by this point. But after a few weeks it will be dry.

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Me, I can generally wait for everything to dry...but if in a hurry, wood glue and possibly some pins like bamboo skewers. We all go at our own pace. As long as we're happy with the result.

I saw elsewhere that you were a Malifaux playtester. Fun game. Never could figure out what Malifaux looked like, terrain wise, so I never built anything except a 3'x3' plain battle board. Ortegas and Cult of December.

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Not playtester actually. Developer.

Malifaux dunctions with about the same coverage of terrain as Infinity actually. That is one of the primary balancers for the Guild. An open field really favors the Guild and Neverborn Dreamer lists.

Back on topic:

You are laminating card stock together to get your curves? How many layers and what type of form are you using if any to set the curve?

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A little Off-Topic is fine. It is the week-end.

Played Ortegas, so know all about open boards. I was trying to say that I couldn't visualize the "look"...part of me thought the old city would look like 16th-17th century Paris, the new stuff would be mid to late 19th century London or San Francisco, and the outlying sutff would be late 19th century American west. Then some of the group went back to their grimme dark master and the rest of us went to the hexagaonal brightness and other fun games. Loved the card dynamic. My compliments to you and all the others who worked on the game. Job well done :)

The curves are laminated from various types of paper*. I just could not get the 'crispness' to the curves that I wanted using any other material. That may say more about my skills than anything else, but so be it. I've got the notion for a few quick how-to posts in the future, time permitting...and if I remember to take WIP shots.

Briefly, I do make forms most of the time. Making the forms is often more time consuming, in terms of labor, than laminating the curves. I make sections, then assemble the curve sections to get the final overall shape. I have just made things up too, which is more fun. The process is layer glue layer, let set, then glue layer. This gets me where I want to be generally. Sometimes more layers...see *below, but never less than three. I can do a how-to with forms too. Pictures are better than words here.

------

*The tighter the curve, the lighter the paper. So for curves with a longer radius, thicker paper like poster board or cereal box **, but with shorter radii, I drop down to 110#, and now that I have some, 75#, and for the really tight curves, maybe 25#. The lighter the paper, the more layers. I use at least three layers, sometimes of mixed weights. You need at least the that much to ensure that the curve holds. I like to build things up to ~1.5mm thick whenever possible. If you plan on keeping the curve attached to the form it doesn't need to be as thick as the free-standing stuff, but it is still a good idea to have enough layers that the surface is not easily dented when you press a finger to it. There is a lot of waiting for glue to dry here. But I like working in short bursts with long breaks anyway, so it's good for me.

**you could also kerf, or maybe the word is score, the surface of the thicker stuff so that its bends easilier, and allows for a tighter radius. This is a really tedious process though.

edit: meant to say 19th century American West.

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Are you going to have interiors for your buildings?  Or are they going to be solid?  

 

Removable roofs and playable interiors is one of the better parts of this game.

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Those barriers/walls are superb! For some reason, I find them more exciting than the buildings though (I don't know why!).

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