Munin

A New Dawn (Narrative Campaign and Batreps)

38 posts in this topic

Spetsnaz Sergeant Grigoriy Antonov was halfway through a demonstration of an advanced technique for quietly killing an opponent with a knife when the perimeter alarms sounded. Given that he was here to help train the garrison troops, Antonov initially thought that this might be some sort of drill or training exercise. But when Lieutenant Olushinskiy, the Veteran Kazak leading the small garrison stationed here at the observatory, looked quizzically at Antonov, both men knew instantly that this was no mere drill. Olushinsky didn't waste a moment; his men were already geared up for a training exercise, and within seconds he had them organized and deploying to protect the facility.

Mt. Horeb was something of an incongruity; the site itself had once been a tiny alpine settlement that was part of the Merovingian sphere of influence. Settled largely by colonists of Belgian descent, the place had an almost quaint look. Indeed, the building that housed the observatory's offices, computers, and data storage systems was an old market building, its open ground floor once used to display goods for sale or trade. During one of the many wars with the Antipodes, the town had been abandoned in favor of a more defensible site. After the Commercial Conflicts, the Ariadnan government had chosen the remote location as the site of a powerful new radio observatory, both as a way to support scientific research as well as to help keep better surveillance of all of the foreign vessels transiting the planet's space. The massive, spherical antenna enclosures stood side-by-side with buildings abandoned for centuries, marrying "old world" nostalgia with a high-tech future.

The garrison force was similarly odd. The observatory was deemed to be critical to Ariadnan security, but was also intended to keep a low profile. So here, in the middle of nowhere, was a small group of seasoned veteran troops engaged in an active training cycle more strenuous than some combat units' operational tempos. Indeed, Antonov had made several trips here to Mt. Horeb in the last several months, usually teaching advanced close combat skills.

After posting men to guard the flanks, Lieutenant Olushinskiy led two of his Veteran Kazak brethren straight toward the heart of the facility. Grigoriy nodded approvingly as the 3-man fire-team rolled smoothly forward, each man covering his compatriots - these men clearly knew their business. They had reached the southernmost antenna housing before the first shot rang out, the sharp whip-crack of a high-velocity sniper round. The bullet struck paramedic specialist Nikolai Galugin in the narrow gap just below the bottom edge of his helmet and just above his shoulder-plate, the hollow-point munition lacerating the arteries and airways of his neck in an instant; he was dead before he hit the ground.

Undeterred, Olushinskiy and his teammate pressed forward, laying down fire and advancing to the cover provided by a couple of old wrecked vehicles near the observatory's main building.

Taking the opposite route, Grigoriy flanked to the east, passing the olive-drab quonset hut used to house the garrison troops. As he carefully advanced - he was quite on his own here - a flicker of movement up ahead caught his attention. Shouldering his sniper rifle, the Spetsnaz operative gazed through the scope. What he saw made his blood run cold; the slithering, snake-like shape, segmented carapace, and multitude of eyes were distinctive. He had first seen such Mechanoids during his combat tour on Paradiso, and that could only mean one thing: the dreaded Combined Army had somehow found Dawn. He had to warn the others. He had to warn everyone!

While his brain threatened to descend into panic, his training and his body's muscle-memory took over. Settling his breathing, slowing his heart-rate, and gently squeezing the trigger, the Spetsnaz operative put a bullet through one of the thing's many eyes, its jerky twitching subsiding after a few brief seconds. It was plenty dead now. As he communicated what he had seen over the comm-net - taking the shocked calls to repeat and confirm in stride - Sergeant Antonov looked around, hoping to spot another target.

It was then that Grigoriy noticed the astronomer in his white lab-coat. The man was sitting on the stone steps leading down from the open ground floor of the main building, idly smoking a cigarette. He seemed completely unconcerned with the gunfire erupting within the quaint old Merovingian village, and it was at this juncture that the Spetsnaz Sergeant reflected that perhaps the aggressive training cycle undertaken by the garrison troops had had an unfortunate side effect on the civilian staff. Without second thought, Grigoriy started making his way toward the man, moving at a crawl to hopefully stay out of line-of-sight from the unseen attackers.

------------------------------------------------------------------

Dozer Field Engineer Ernst Zaczek was taken by surprise when the Uragan Tracktor Mul beside him suddenly lurched to life. Hooked up to numerous wires and equipment, the Remote had been undergoing a battery of diagnostic tests and software upgrades here in Zaczek's loft workshop. When it trundled to the nearby window and began disgorging a hail of rocket fire, the technician realized that it was responding to an actual perimeter alert. "Huh," he thought, "I guess the new automated target link software works."

Approaching the still-firing Remote - careful to avoid the dangerous and deafening back-blast - Zaczek began disconnecting the leads and diagnostic equipment as quickly as he could; should the Uragan need to hastily relocate, it wouldn't do to have all of this junk hanging off it and slowing it down.

A flash in his peripheral vision was all the warning the young Field Engineer had. Instinctively hitting the deck, Zaczek felt a wave of heat roll over him as his Uragan was suddenly bathed in a coruscating wash of super-heated plasma. The big Remote fell silent, save for the faint clicking of its metal carapace as it cooled.

Taking a moment to survey the damage - from the safety of his spot lying on the floor - Zaczek realized that the drone's optics and targeting module was scorched to slag. But there was a brand new one lying on the table beside him. "I can fix this!" he thought.

As he reached for his open toolbox, Ernst Zaczek noted with some consternation that all of the hair had been cleanly singed from his right arm.

 

------------------------------------------------------------------

Carl Davis gave a shiver and pulled his dirty bathrobe more tightly around his rangy body, the thin material doing little to protect him from the chilly mountain air. Still, it was good to get outside once in a while. Whenever Guibet took a smoke-break, Davis liked to stroll the old cobblestoned square a little bit, to stretch his legs and enjoy the quiet, which was usually a nice change from all of the noise of the racks of computers and equipment in the observatory.

Not that it was all that quiet this morning. Live-fire exercises were relatively common here at Mt. Horeb, though he got the impression from the volume of fire that perhaps the troops were being particularly enthusiastic this morning. And somebody clearly had a new toy, as there was this weird 'zooWOPszzz' noise he'd never heard before.

Anyway, it was probably time to get back to work. As the lanky astronomer turned to head back to the main building, he suddenly saw what to all appearances was a half-naked woman with vibrant red skin and snow-white hair scuttling across the cobbles in an eerily smooth leopard-crawl. Though he'd seen Warcor footage from the combat zones on Paradiso, it took his brain a moment to register the fact that he was looking at a Morat. An actual, live Morat. Here. On Dawn. And by the time he had adequately parsed this incongruous nugget of information enough to register fear, it was too late; leaping up at him from her crouched position, the Morat woman seized him by the hair, pushed a fearsome-looking pistol in his face, and growled in a gutteral, strangely-accented English, "Where are the back-ups?"

"The whu...?" The pain as she struck him across the side of the head with her pistol made him go crosseyed.

"The data back-ups. Where are they?"

She could only be talking about the emergency storage redundancies. Without stopping to consider the ramifications of his actions, he pointed towards the main building and blurted "Ah, jeez, they're in the gray safe on the second floor."

"Safe?" she inquired menacingly. "Biometrics?"

"What?"

She hit him again. "Safe! It has biometrics?" She had every look of being ready to cut off a body part. Thankfully, the redundancies were kept in an old bomb-proof storage safe protected by an ancient combination lock, so that wouldn't be necessary. "No, no, no, just a combination! Just numbers!"

This seemed to take the Morat woman a second or two to process, at which point she viciously jammed the pistol into the astronomer's left eye socket, the pressure threatening to pop the fragile organ. "What is combination? Say the numbers!"

"Ah, god, fuck, it's um... 17-96-32-81!" he squealed. Carl Davis was a scientist; he had no combat experience and zero knowledge of the Morat or how they operated. As such, it came as a complete (if very brief) surprise to him when she pulled the trigger, scattering his brains out the back of his head and casually letting his lifeless body slump to the cobblestones.

------------------------------------------------------------------

The comm-net was utter chaos. The Scout trooper covering the facility's western approaches confirmed what Spetsnaz Sergeant Antonov had reported; they were facing the Morat right here on Dawn. Lieutenant Olushinskiy found it hard to believe, but the enemy trooper that crossed his line-of-fire in the distance sure-as-shit looked like a Morat to him too. Reacting to the enemy's movement, the Veteran Kazak officer squeezed off a quick burst from his HMG, though his shot was wide. Olushinskiy's teammate was a hair quicker on the draw, the man's T2 rifle blasting a head-sized hole in the enemy trooper's torso.

Still, more enemy troopers could be seen advancing into covered firing positions at the edge of the village. This was about to get even uglier.

------------------------------------------------------------------

Lieutenant Rutak didn't know whether it was the injuries he sustained in the Satorak ritual slowing him down, or whether it was just his unlucky day. Either way, he'd caught a hyper-velocity frangible Teseum round to the chest. It had punched right through his armor and made mincemeat of most of his internal organs. As he bled out on the ground, his last sight was of the other members of his team closing in on the enemy facility. Finally losing consciousness, his last thought was that his beloved Rodok regiment would win glory this day, and that he had been in a position to win them the opportunity to do so.

A better death he could not have asked for.

TO BE CONTINUED...

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jacques Guibet had begun to suspect something was amiss. The nearness and intensity of the fire was different from the usual live-fire drills the garrison troops usually conducted. And when the deluge of missiles pouring out of the second-story window of the nearby workshop - in and of itself highly irregular - was answered with a blast of eye-searing plasma, he knew something was very wrong. The camouflaged trooper low-crawling across the street towards him was frantically motioning for him to get down, and Guibet didn't need to be told twice.

He recognized Sergeant Antonov, as the man had been coming here to Mt. Horeb to conduct training for a while now. "Sergeant, what's happening?"

The Spetsnaz non-com's deadly serious reply forestalled any incredulity he might otherwise have had. "We're under attack by the Morat."

Guibet's head spun as he considered the ramifications of that simple statement. Here? How? Why? Initially he couldn't comprehend the reason the Morat would be interested in such a remote facility. Then it hit him; "The data. They have to be here for the data!" he gasped. And then the further ramifications of that thought occurred to him. "Oh, god. What if there's a wormhole entrance from alien space right here in the Dawn system? Some way around the Paradiso blockades?"

"We don't have time to worry about that right now," growled Antonov, "we need to get you out of here." The sergeant tugged on the scientist's lab coat, but the man resisted.

"No, we need to save the data! It's got to be what they're after!" Guibet stuck his head up just long enough to see the rapidly-approaching Morat troopers before Antonov yanked him back down.

The grizzled soldier was having none of it. "I'll get the data. You make a run for it," he said, pointing towards the barracks building.

"You'll need the combination," said Guibet. He recited the code and made Antonov correctly repeat it back to him twice before he allowed himself to make a sprint for safety. The protective Spetsnaz non-com was right on his heels and furiously communicating this tactical wrinkle to the rest of the garrison.

------------------------------------------------------------------

Things were just not going Ernst Zaczek's way. He had the new targeting module ready to go, but he couldn't pry open the armored access hatch. It appeared to be partially fused shut. By this point, the engineer had been reduced to cursing and banging on the external housing with a heavy wrench, trying desperately to crack it loose. "God! Dammit! Why! Won't! You! Open!"

With the last strike, the wrench actually punched through the beaten, plasma-annealed plate and lodged deeply in the drone's internal control circuitry. A spray of sparks and a puff of acrid blue smoke evidenced that this particular Traktor Mul was now beyond mere field repair. "Aw, drek."

At a loss for what to do now, Zaczek heard the call over the comm-net that the redundant back-ups needed to be secured. Briefed in preparation for just such an unthinkable event, the engineer knew that in addition to the safe in the main building, there was another, more clandestine receptacle for the observatory's data. Sprinting across the room and down the stairs, he keyed his radio. "I'm on it!"

------------------------------------------------------------------

The fire coming from the two heavily-armored humans near the central square was relentless, and threatened to stall the Morat advance. As he watched, Master Sergeant Kraetak - now in charge of this operation since Lieutenant Rutak's death - saw one of them gun down one of the squad's Zerat infiltrators as she tried to make it to the building they'd been told contained the target data.

Enough screwing around, it was time to end this. "GE12, this is M42, immediate suppression, grid NK633901, over!"

The response was immediate and gratifying; "M42, target grid NK633901 confirmed, torpedo away, GE12 out." Somewhere high above, a gunner aboard the "Gaki's Embrace" had just loosed an ordnance package that even now was accelerating towards the planet's surface.

------------------------------------------------------------------

A brief hissing in his headset was Lieutenant Olushinskiy's only indication of trouble. Caused by white noise in the radio-frequency spectrum as a result of the ionization wave of the Morat torpedo's entry through Dawn's atmosphere, the Veteran Kazak officer barely had time to register the noise before the munition detonated. Fused to explode a mere five meters above the ground, the resulting shockwave and firestorm obliterated both Olushinskiy and his remaining Veteran teammate.

------------------------------------------------------------------

With the enemy redoubt reduced to a smoking crater and the way forward cleared, Kraetak led his team's advance. His machine gunner worked his way around the eastern edge of the building, engaging another human there. While Kraetak and another teammate covered the other likely approaches, final member of the Rodok fire-team activated his jump-armor. Crashing through the second story window, the Morat soldier marched straight to the safe in question. Using the code so helpfully obtained by one of the Zerats, his call on the tac-net was not long in coming. "Objective secured."

They had what they'd come for. Now it was time to clean up. Kraetak grinned as he gave the order. "Excellent. Now let's scrub this place."

------------------------------------------------------------------

Ernst Zaczek stayed low as he exited the front door of his workshop and sprinted across the street. Amazingly, he made it to the cover of a burned-out car without attracting any unwanted attention, although he saw an enemy trooper looking out the upper-floor window of the observatory's main building.

But this particular junked car wasn't just a convenient piece of cover. Oh, no, this particular car - a hunk of rusting trash left over from the time when this settlement was originally occupied before the first Antipode Wars - also served as the perfect camouflage for the second back-up storage device. It was a redundancy to the redundancy, and very few people knew of its existence. Zaczek himself hadn't actually known the access code - that information was compartmentalized with the civilians for security's sake - but Sergeant Antonov had managed to secure and communicate that information before he'd been killed by HMG fire. Now it was up to Zaczek - who actually knew where the device was - to perform the critical task of retrieving the valuable data storage modules.

Dropping low and crawling to the far side of the wrecked vehicle, he popped open the trunk. The lid rose smoothly on well-oiled hinges. Brushing aside some filthy rags and a bunch of carefully scattered trash that served as further camouflage, the engineer revealed a gleaming, high-tech, EMP-shielded storage safe. It was actually cemented into the ground, the wrecked car being emplaced around it. Entering the combination numbers on its keypad, the box popped open. Zaczek began removing the modules and stuffing them in his knapsack as fast as he could.

There was no time to lose; he could here the gutteral shouts of the alien troopers as they closed, along with the occasional gunfire as they finished off a wounded straggler. Steeling himself, Dozer Engineer Ernst Zaczek chose his moment and made a bee-line for the nearby woods.

He made it all the way to the treeline and had time to breathe a heavy sigh of relief before the first heavy-caliber bullet fired from a Morat HMG struck him.

------------------------------------------------------------------

Rodok trooper Kurgaz saw the human flee towards the forest. Bringing his HMG to bear, he let off a long burst. The expenditure of ammunition probably wasn't necessary, but if fighting in jungles had taught Kurgaz anything it was that there was no such thing as overkill.

------------------------------------------------------------------

Jacques Guibet stood with his back to the barracks building, his chest heaving; his sister always told him that smoking would kill him, she just hadn't known how. The metal wall of the quonset hut felt cold against his back. And where was Sergeant Antonov? The Spetsnaz non-com had been right behind him just a moment ago. Suddenly feeling very alone, Guibet glanced around. It had gotten eerily quiet. He heard a furtive footfall just around the corner. Thinking it must be his protector, he whispered, "Grigoriy?" and hazarded a peek.

The hulking, jump-armored Rodok trooper was the last thing astronomer Jacques Guibet saw.
 

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PICTURE TIME!

As mentioned previously, this mission was 20x20 #19, Seize Hardware. Given the narrative behind the mission, we made one alteration, which was that the Morat could execute the scientists after interrogating them, which meant that if the Kazakhs wanted the codes, they needed to get to them first. Here's the battlefield:

qsZGbD04CpsBkLd1HOjZr88lboQKVQNoEdTIyCkO

The Morat player won initiative and chose deployment, coming on from the bottom edge. The Kazakh player thus had the top edge and took first turn. This board was interesting because most of the hills were 2" or 3" high, which completely blocked line of sight. That said, I think the Morat player chose the side he did because it gave him the easiest approach to the main building in the center.

The reason that was important was because one of the objectives was actually inside the building, which you can see here:

d8lYpYRs-QvMm4nHqFtKo30_b-N4DDhVYsoJLPep

The other objective is the grey crate on the back of the demolished pick-up truck just at the bottom-left corner of the quonset hut. In this picture you can also see poor Carl Davis strolling along in the square, completely unprepared for what's about to happen. The other scientist is obscured on the other side of the main building. Oh, and speaking of the main building, if you look close, you'll see that it has an open ground floor. That mean that at ground level, the center of the board was actually quite open, but elevate firing positions at the edges or in the deployment zones couldn't generally draw LOF through it. But it also has a raised floor about a half-inch high - there was a ton of crawling going on, with figures on both sides using prone movement to approach the main building without getting lit up. Here's a better example:

SnYoAlUo2zjfTnEr3zieMTYzhQTnQ9PD_ov7h8jH

Here you can see the 3-man Veteran Kazak fireteam as they're about to move out. Just after this photo was taken, the Veteran Kazakh Paramedic got lit up by a DA munition from a Yaogat Sniper, and miraculously failed both rolls.

Speaking of failing rolls, this game had one of the most unfortunate sequences of dice rolling I think I've ever seen. The Kazakh player was engaged in a "duel of the TR Bots" between his Uragan and the Morat player's Plasma-equipped Q-Drone. The Uragan came out on the losing end of that, but that's not the unfortunate part. By the end of that exchange, the Uragan was in its first level of unconscious. The Kazakh player had a Dozer nearby who made a WIP-roll - and failed. He burned a Command Token - and failed again. He burned a second Command Token - and failed a third time. OK, no worries, we've just dropped to 2nd Unconscious. He can still save this. He burns another order to fix the remote - and fails that too. Spitting bile and vitriol, he burns his last Command Token (he'd used one pre-game to power his campaign special rule) for a final re-roll - and fails a 5th consecutive WIP roll, killing his own drone in the process. I couldn't believe what I was seeing. I'd never witnessed such unlucky dice rolling. A Dozer has a WIP of 13. The odds of failing 5 consecutive WIP 13 rolls are 0.525%, or just a hair over 190 to 1. </C3PO>

The picture above also shows one of the two Zerats the Morat player brought to the fight. Deployed prone in the square, these proved to be devastatingly effective at keeping the Kazakh player from being able to push too far forward, as otherwise he was risking the Zerats turning the central square into a literal minefield.

The rusted-out police car and fire engine in the square was where the two remaining Veteran Kazakhs set up shop. Here they had good cover and good LOF to the likely approach of the Morat player's Rodoks. One of them had an AP HMG, the other a T2 rifle. That is a NASTY combination! So nasty in fact that the Morat player had to use his campaign special ability to call in an orbital strike:

yXL68akJaP7hcXTl7p6akxySW4tINORW5Q91Xb4c

No good can come of this. The weapon is AP+Exp, and both Veteran Kazakhs were pretty much annihilated. Once these two were out of the way, the Morat player had a fairly clear access to the main building. In this scenario, each player places one of the scientists and one of the objective crates. Making things tough for his opponent, the Morat player put one of the crates on the 2nd floor of the central building, knowing that his super-jumping Rodoks wouldn't have to burn orders going up the stairs - they could just leap in through the windows! Fiendishly clever!

DE857z-Jw0sji008XOUVWE7TAfTtQ39xSviCW6Hr

Here we see Spetsnaz Sergeant Grigoriy Antonov, who successfully synch-ed one of the Civilians (Jacques Guibet, seen here fleeing to safety). It's a little tough to see because the marker is behind him, but Grigoriy is prone here. The Kazakh player made very clever use of Grigoriy's movement and ZOC to maximize Guibet's synch'ed movement, crawling Grigoriy just far enough back to be able to get Guibet to safety without sacrificing Grigoriy's position near the center of the board.

The scenario is 4 Turns, but by the end of Turn 3, the Morat player had actually tabled the Kazakh player. That sounds like a blow-out, but it wasn't. Up until the next-to-last order of the Morat player's 3rd Turn, the game was actually tied at 3 OP each (each player had successfully interrogated one Civilian and opened one crate). And had the lone Dozer Field Engineer survived, in the Kazakh player's 4th and final Active Turn, he'd have had to make only 1 successful Move+Dodge in order to break LOF. After that he was home free. Given that you always get a minimum of 2 orders when down to a lone survivor, he'd then have gotten another 8" of movement towards the rear and I'm not sure the Morat player could have caught him. The game would have ended in a tie, as neither player was in a position to achieve their secondary objective (which I can't for the life of me remember). So even though it ended in a tabling, the game felt like it hung on every roll most of the way through, which was great.

And of course that meant that poor Jacques Guibet was the only human left on the board. And while the game was technically over, the Morat were operating under one simple principle: No witnesses.  >:)

5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really cool reports/stories! I look forward to the next installation :)

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The orbital strike seems to be pretty powerful, taking out almost 90 ponts worth of Kazaks! 

Even though it makes sense from the background, the ability of the Morats to kill the civvies put the Kazaks at a serious disadvantage.

Don t worry about the secondary mission, they often don t play out, which I don t even see as a problem.

Great narrative as always!

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Orbital Strike is indeed powerful, but using it costs a Command Token, which is pricey in and of itself. It is of note that the one he used here was actually his last (as he'd burned one to reduce the Kazakh order pool and two others re-forming his link team). Mostly, the trick is to avoid bunching up with lots of valuable models. Had the Veteran Kazaks been about a half inch further apart, he'd only have been able to get one of them in the blast radius (unless he wanted to pay the Speculative Fire modifier to bypass needing to center the template on a trooper).

Amusingly enough, he once used it against a Caledonian fireteam of Volunteers, catching three of them in the blast. Two of them dodged and the third made 2 of 3 Armor saves - just dropping to Unconscious - leading the Morat player to joke that apparently he'd set his torpedos to "stun" that day.

And yes, we recognized the advantage that the ability to kill civilians gave to the Morat player. We discussed it before the mission, and everyone involved thought the asymmetry would make for an interesting game. For the Kazakhs, it was offset somewhat by the ability to synch the civilians and move them out of harm's way. Additionally, it's not like the Morat player could shoot them from across the table - he had to execute them while in B2B contact, and only after successfully interrogating them.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cool. you made my scenario even more complicated. I really love what you are doing with the scenarios, giving an in depth reason for every one, etc. 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've been having a blast with it. Tonight saw the first game of the 3rd Campaign Turn played. That's 11 games in the bag for this campaign so far, more successive campaign games than we've ever played in any other tabletop rule set. We'd started 40K campaigns many a time, but they always fizzled after a few games. The fact that Infinity is engaging and you can get through a 300 point game in 2 hours makes it so much better. The variety of missions in 20x20 helps too, as it's easy to find a cool narrative that fits with the mission objectives.

For example, tonight's mission was Scenario #4 (Destroy Beacon), in which the Morat were attacking the "Expand Illegal Exploitation" track (the JSA primary). The defenders were actually the Caledonians, working with the JSA to smuggle un-taxed Teseum off-world in exchange for weapons/military hardware. There was a Japanese cargo craft in-bound to the facility during inclement weather, using instrument-aided navigation. If the Morat could take down the landing site's nav beacon and put up their own (sending false/confusing signals), they could cause the JSA ship to crash on approach. The Caledonians, having figured out that something was very wrong, needed to take out the dummy nav beacon in time in order to save the inbound ship. Boom, an instant narrative and a very fun battle.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

would be cool if you could include some of the scenarios published in Lost Missions. Black Operation and Kidnap Engineers should be balanced enough and fun. 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, if you've read these stories and wondered about the mechanics we're using to drive this narrative, I finally got off my butt and finished writing up the campaign system we use to back this campaign. While it was originally designed for the forces and factions in our meta, there's a big section on how to adapt it to your own forces or different settings. The folks over at DataSphere have kindly hosted it. Please take a look and let us know what you think!

Handy link: http://www.data-sphere.net/new-dawn-alternative-campaign-system/

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great read, super stuff!!  Really enjoyed reading through it.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks! I'm partway through the next installment. I hope to have it posted soon!

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great news @Munin I've been wondering what's been happening on New Dawn. Can't wait to read more. You could compile all these into a book.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now