surreal_trip

Army Painter Quick Shade?

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Hey gents, So just got my PanO knights delivered... I'm new to this whole painting thing...

With that said, what do you think of quck shader for a new guy? I'd like my forces to look decent, but I lack skill and anyone to teach me how to paint, and I suspected that the quick shade would be a quick and efficient way of overcoming my own painting shortcomings...

If you're really against it let me know why? Do you think it will glob up the mini's detail? Any other suggestions or recommendations?

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In all honestly:

Quickshader isn't really going to compensate for lack of skills, it will just save you time to do highlightings\shadowings. It wont magically fix any error you'll do on detailings and you WILL have to paint gems\details\stuff by yourself anyway.

Quickshader is good for armies in games where you field 30+ models since they'll all blend together, but for stuff like infinity I'd say you should paint your figures one at time.

Now if you want to work around lack of skill, I'd advice drybrushing and washes rather than quickshasding. Youre going to get definetely better results with that.

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Infinity miniatures are metal, so whatever happens, you can always strip them and start again easily enough.

That said, I think the quick shade is more designed for models that have chunkier detail and more texture. You could dip your Infinity models and be happy with them anyway; depends on what you want/are happy with/are prepared to try.

However, I think you should probably have a go at more traditional methods of painting by hand. It isn't as hard as you might think, and many people rather enjoy it. Just take your time, paint neatly, and don't feel the need to rush.

There is lots of good painting advice on this forum (and many others too), so if you need further help, have a look around and then ask more questions.

Generally though (and to get you started) you will need:

1) An idea of a colour scheme, and what you want for your bases.

This focuses you on buying a few paints that you know you will need. I think you should by black and white as well, regardless of your scheme. Bases can be as simple as you want, and you can buy ready-made resin ones too if you are after something fancy and don't have the confidence to try making your own.

2) Buy some primer. Many people will recommend many of their favourites, but I am going to suggest buying some grey automotive spray primer. Simple to use, neutral colour, and most automotive primers are decent quality and affordable.

3) Buy some paint. Again, many brands available. I'd suggest acrylic, and recommend either Formula P3, Vallejo Model Colour or Vallejo Game Colour. All cover well, are reasonably economic, and can be thinned with water. Try and stick to a couple of shades for each main colour in your chosen scheme, plus black and white. You may want some metallic paint too; I'd suggest a bright silver - it's quite universal, and can be easily darkened by mixing it with a little black.

4) Buy some brushes. You will want some natural sable artist's brushes. Some people prefer synthetic brushes, but I find them quite hard to control and short-lived. You will want ones which come to a sharp point naturally for doing fine detail work with (rather than just a small brush as conventional wisdom may suggest). Get a couple that you feel comfortable with. There are many brands, but choosing something that works for you is the important thing. Don't skimp too much either, as fighting against your primary tools when learning to paint is an unnecessary impediment to improvement. Spending $5 on a brush is okay, and if you like the $10 ones more, then get one of those.

5) Get painting! When you're done, you might want to seal your model with some varnish in order to protect the paint job from handling. I recommend a good-quality brush-on acrylic gloss varnish, followed by a matte spray once it's dry. This gives the best protection, and the most pleasing (to me!) aesthetic finish.

All of the above assumes you've cleaned up and assembled your models BTW. If you need a hand with some more advice for that, then just shout! :)

Anyway, we look forward to seeing what the results of your labours are!

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I use quickshade on my 40k armies, but you do have to still have a clean paint job underneath.

It is also fairly thick. While fine for GW, you will need to thin it for the fine details of Infinity minis (you can do this with turpentine). If you don't properly remover all of the mold lines, Quickshade will really make the flash stand out.

But I agree that with Infinity and such few models (not the 50+ of 40k) washes and inks might suit you better.

Some key points to reinforce.

-get a set of needle files (super cheap and most all model/hobby shops sell them) and file off the flash

-wash them. let them soak in warm mildly soapy water for 5-10min, then rinse clean (this helps to remove the grease and will greatly assist the paint in adhering to the metal)

-Primer/Spray base coat. White, Grey, Black, whatever you want. But do several light coats if need be. Light spray paint coats are ALWAYS better than thick ones.

-Have fun, and just get to it!

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I used quickshade on a couple of my infinity minis. It was meant as a test, but they actually didn't turn out half bad. Big thing is, they tend to look pretty grungy, so it doesn't lend itself well to the cleaner looking style.

Quickshade does add a nice hard gloss coating, but otherwise you can get very similar results with GW washes thinned 3:1 or so and it's not as messy or expensive.

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While I use a wash like the Army Painter quickshade (and for the same purpose), Army Painter is really pricey for what it does.

My starting paint recommendations (assuming you can find GW paints): Mechrite Red, Iyanden Darksun, and Astronomican Grey. Chaos Black and Skull White. At least Badab Black, Devlan Mud, and Orgyn Flesh, but all the Washes are good. Use the foundation paints for your base colors for red, yellow, and gray/white. Any of the other colors won't need the extra punch, except maybe brown.

Now, if you can find P3 paints, I would add Armor Wash and Mixing Medium to your collection. I do a lot of drybrushing, and P3 paints don't drybrush well in my experience. However, they are really great for layering, and their reds are pretty good.

If you can find Vallejo paints, get Black Ink and Sepia Ink. The inks behave differently than the Citadel Washes. I use Vallejo Model Color almost exclusively, except for painting faces. I use Reaper Master Series for faces.

And now for the dirty, nasty trick. Future Floor Polish and some kind of mixing palette. (I think It's been renamed to 'Pledge with Future Shine,' but it's the same formula in the US). Prime your mini, let dry. Paint your base coats, whatever they are. Now take one drop of Black Ink, one drop of Future, and about 5-8 drops of water, mix well. Then slop that all over the mini, and let dry several hours (Future really slows down the drying time), overnight is better. Instant blacklined mini. Once your blacklines are dry, then you can go back and drybrush with your base colors again, and highlight as needed.

Brushes: GW brushes are OK, but they don't last very long, even if you take good care of them. They're fine for starting out. I still use a couple GW brushes, like the Large drybrush and the Large Flat drybrush. If you're just starting out, I'd get a large brush, standard brush, and a fine detail brush.

I spent the cash on *really* good brushes, and some stuff to take care of them: Winsor & Newton Series 7s. I have a couple #3s, a #1, and I think a #00. I haven't used the smaller brushes much, because the #3 holds a point well enough that I can paint eyebrows with it. The Series 7s last a long time, I haven't replaced my first #3 since I bought it in ... '07, I think. I would replace GW brushes every 6 months or so.

Oh, I do have one other trick to tell you about: painting faces. Faces are absolutely the hardest part of the model to paint.

Here's how I do it: Like I said, I use Reaper Master series triads. They've already figured out a shadow, base, and highlight color for you, and they have something like 10 different tone triads. I start with the shadow color for whatever triad I'm using (Usually Golden, since I'm painting Yu Jing). Don't thin the first application, you want it to cover. Once your first or second coat of the base has dried, hit all the skin with either Ogryn Flesh for a redder skintone or Devlan Mud for a browner skintone. Even painting purple-black Africans, I prefer Ogryn Flesh, but Mongolians, Mexicans, and Native Americans look better with Devlan Mud. Then get your base color out again, and thin it with a brushfull of clean water. Mix well, then apply to all the slightly raised parts of the model. Take your time here, you're starting to build up the highlights.

Then, get some of the 'base' color for your skintone, and add a brushfull of water to that. Mix well, but don't cover quite as much of the raised parts of the face this time. Again, take your time, it's hard to go back and fix mistakes here. For guys, I stop with the base color, although I may use another thin coat to help the highlights stand out. For ladies, I add some of the highlight color to the thinned mix, add a little more water, and just touch the highest points: cheeks, tip of the nose, and then a light touch to the forehead. Take your time, and if the paint isn't cooperating, don't worry about it. Clean the brush, put it down, and walk away. Try again in a couple hours.

Don't bother with painting eyes, the shadows you've built up will trick your eyes into seeing them on the model.

For final details, if you're *really* going to town, hit the eyebrows with your hair mid-tone, but thin it a bit so the skin tone can show thru. For the ladies, take your base color and add a very little red to it, then just paint the bottom lip. If you paint the upper lip too, she looks like a ... 'night-time working girl', if you know what I mean.

Sorry for the long post, but there's a lot of stuff to teach a new guy.

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I use quickshade (strong tone) on my haqqislam and I've figured out how to get great results. Here are my tips:

Basecoat AND highlight before dipping

Stronger highlights = better highlights

Don't let the dip settle where it may - after flicking it off to the best of your ability, wipe it off of pooling areas (faces tend to get the worst) and off of large smooth areas. This will let the dip do what it does best.

I find the dip works best with "warm" colors (strong tone). The dark tone is intended for "cool" colors but I don't think it works as well overall.

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Excellent tips folks!

So My decision is to go with some krylon grey primer, with my paint scheme going to be a base of grey with some 'ultramarine blue' and some 'Spacewolf ice blue'... I think this will give me a good range... My plan as it stands now is as follows:

1. clean up flash and mold lines

2. Wash mini's

3. prime with 1-2 light coats

4. Gray paint mixed with water (I'm thinking almost 50/50) (To cover up any misses or gaps in the spray)

5. Paint secondary colours (Dark blue and light blue)

6. Highlight colours (a little silver mixed in with the blues to give them a bit of glitter and show some wear)

7. black washes for the grey area's and blue washes for the blue areas

8. Finish colours eyes and bits of details and fix any issues

Seem about on par... any suggestions or recommendations for my steps? (It's actually remarkably hard to find a step by step with explanations of each step on how to take a mini from packaging to gaming table)

P.S. When It all comes down to the wire I may just toss some quick shade on it to finish it all up in the end anyways!

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I have dipped all of my 40k miniatures to great success mainly because I like the added layer of depth that it can add, but also as another layer of protection from my two-year old who sometimes "finds" my miniatures. If you do decide to "dip" your Infinity miniatures, I highly recommend that you use the brush method over standard dipping techniques. It will be less messy, give you greater control, , uses less dip, and prevents any grungy build up. Best of luck. I plan on dipping my Infinity miniatures.... now just to get some.

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Just a note:

Space Wolves Grey and Ice Blue are two different colors from GW range.

Ice is a really light blue while Space Wolves is a really light grey. If you want to go Ultramarine Blue I'd suggest to go Ice Blue.

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I've been a long time proponent of minwax polyshades, which is pretty much the same as the army painter stuff but almost one third the cost. It functions in the same way; provides shading and protection.

You get out of it what you put into it. Just like any other painting technique. It is not a magic bullet to make all your painting hopes come true, but it is a simple shortcut that will get you respectable results if you prepare your figures well, basecoat everything cleanly, brush on the minwax, allow twelve hours or more to dry, go back for a couple touch-up highlights, spray with several thin finishes of testors dullcote.

I recommend two tins (20-24$ total depending where you buy it).

Antique Walnut satin for lighter warm colors

Black satin for dark warm or cool colors (thin for medium to lighter colors)

Both can be tinted with oil paints as well if you really want to get into the possibilities, but at that level of commitment you might as well learn/ use more conventional methods because you aren't saving all that much time.

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